Uncharted 4 and Life Priorities

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As I am writing this blog post, there are only 21 days until the release of Naughty Dog’s next entry in the Uncharted series, “Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End.” It should be said that I am a huge Naughty Dog fan and a huge fan of the Uncharted series. I have played through the first three games and I am half way through the PlayStation Vita title, “Uncharted: The Golden Abyss.”

If you are someone who has never played or seen an Uncharted game. The games are story driven and focus on the character of Nathan Drake. Each story is one of grand adventure, much like an Indian Jones movie. Drake finds ancient treasures through exploration and many different shootouts with the bad guys of the game.

In preparation for the fourth and final Nathan Drake story, I have been playing through the first three Uncharted games again. As I have been playing through these games and have watched the different promotions for Uncharted 4, a common theme began to clarify in the overarching story of Nathan Drake. This theme has been made even apparent by the most recent Uncharted 4 trailer:

To me, the theme is one of life priories. At the beginning of the Uncharted series, Drake is in the search for Eldorado and its treasures. In the process he meets and starts a relationship with Elena Fisher. Throughout the next two games, his relationship with Elena (SPOILER ALERT) continues to be an up and down style of relationship. Part of the reason for this rocky road of a relationship is Drake’s obsession with risking his life for certain treasures. From the trailer above, it seems like this theme is going to carry over into this final chapter in Drake’s story as well.

This has caused me to look at my own life. Are there things in my own life that I am perhaps pursuing at the possible detriment of those around me? As a Christian, am I pursuing my own personal goals to the detriment of my relationship with Jesus?

Matthew 16:25 states: “All who want to save their lives will lose them. But all who lose their lives because of me will find them.”

Whether you are Christian or not, it all comes down to the priorities of our life. What is the most important thing? I cannot wait for later in my life to begin to build the habits and priorities I desire for my life. If I want to be a better writer, I need to start now. If I want to exercise more, I need to start now. If I want to make church and my relationship with God a priority, I need to start now. Every day that I let something else take the place of what I want to give a high priority to, is a day that I am changing my priorities to the them replacing the first priority.

More than likely, you and I will not end up in a situation where we have to choose between family and treasure, like Nathan Drake, but we might have to make a choice between those we love and something else. By the grace of God may we always make the right choice.

Uncharted 4 releases May 10th. Click here to learn more about the Uncharted series and purchase your copy today.


 

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A Youth Pastor’s Must Read: Youth Ministry in a Post-Christian World

 

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I have been a youth pastor for six years now. One thing that I have learned from these years of ministry is that part of being a good youth pastor, or a good pastor in general, is the ability to be a continuous learner. I never assume what I know and understand about youth ministry is the best or even most satisfactory way to minster. Youth ministry is a constant race to keep up with your students.

A few years ago, I sent a message out to some of my fellow youth pastor friends asking for book recommendations. A friend recommended a book, by Brock Morgan, titled “Youth Ministry in a Post-Christian World: A Hopeful Wake-Up Call.” I proceeded to purchase it, but it sat on my kindle for a year and a half before I finally sat down to read Morgan’s book.

In case you are someone who doesn’t like reading a lot of writing or you are skimming this post, I want to make this clear from the beginning. If you are youth pastor in the United States and have not read “Youth Ministry in a Post-Christian World: A Hopeful Wake-Up Call,” GO AND PURCHASE IT AMAZON NOW and read it.

I genuinely believe it is a must read for any youth pastor and even some lead pastors. Morgan does an amazing job of painting a picture of the world and mindset of the students in our youth ministries. Further, he explains why the methods of our youth ministry past might not be working any more.

He touches on subject like:

  • What defines the post-Christian world (as I am sure some of you are already asking, but I don’t want to take away from his book).
  • What are post-Christian world students looking for in faith?
  • How to properly define success in youth ministry
  • How to keep your focus and keep going

Ministry is a constantly changing field. Even more so when it comes to the youth of our churches. As youth ministers, we sometimes bear the heavy burden and expectations of keeping students in our churches. If we hope to even succeed, we best understand our ministry purpose and the students we are ministering too.

This post is not really a book review. This post is a book recommendation. If you are interested in reading Morgan’s book, you can click here to head over to amazon and purchase a physical copy of kindle version.

I want to close this recommendation with a quote from “Youth Ministry in a Post-Christian World: A Hopeful Wake-Up Call.”

“The essence of youth ministry is to create environments where students can experience the warmth of God. With every talk we give, every game or activity we lead, and every time we run into students at the mall, they experience God’s warmth. And that’s because our relationship with Jesus is our ministry.”

Morgan, Brock (2013-09-24). Youth Ministry in a Post-Christian World: A Hopeful Wake-Up Call (Kindle Locations 159-161). The Youth Cartel. Kindle Edition.

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